Why Gavin Newsom Didn’t Want Audit Tracking $24 Billion in Homeless Spending?

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California, under Gavin Newsom, poured billions in tax money into a gun and fired it at “expert” homeless non-profits. The problem began when people started asking where the $24 billion went. Gavin Newsom and his Democrat super-majority have no idea where it went or whether it did any good whatsoever.

According to Kevin Kiley a former legislator and now a congressman, the state’s expenditures were not tracked by a new audit. Newsom was against it.

Gavin Newsom left California with a $73 billion deficit for the year.

Kiley called the results of the audit “infuriating”.

Kiley wrote:

California spent $24 Billion on homelessness over the past five years. However, they did not monitor if this massive expenditure of funds improved the situation. Newsom refused to allow the audit in 2020 when I asked for it. Now we know why he didn’t want his spending to be scrutinized.

Assemblyman Josh Hoover approved the audit last year. The findings today are more shocking than I expected. According to the audit, the California Interagency Council on Homelessness “ceased monitoring expenditure on programs in 2020 and whether or not they worked.” The audit revealed that the California Interagency Council on Homelessness had “stopped monitoring spending on programs in 2020 and whether they were working.”  A Democrat Senator in the State of California has also decried the “lack of transparency on all levels”.

The state has also attracted 32% more homelessness due to its laxer drug laws. Kiley says that “half the unsheltered homeless Americans now live here.” California is spending more money to combat homelessness.

The office of legislative analyst reported interestingly that California was not only in massive debt but that the $24 billion the state had expected to come in hadn’t. “Our forecast is $24 Billion less than the Governor’s Budget for 2022-2023 to 2024-2025.”

The analyst could also add $24 billion in taxpayer funds that were used for homeless programs but not tracked.

Accounts of San Diego and San Jose have been reviewed.

Both cities were unable to identify their revenue and expenses related to homelessness because they did not have an effective system in place for tracking and reporting spending.

Both cities have entered into agreements with non-profits and service providers external to the city to provide services and programs for homeless people. The agreements have not been evaluated by either city.

A town once known for being a naval powerhouse is now ruled by socialists. The Silicon Valley headquarters are also socialist-run.

The money spent on the project was not used in a good way.

San Diego has several performance measures, which include how many people service providers will help. San Diego, on the other hand, does not always do this. It is unable to tell if the service providers are making the best use of their funds.

The auditor said that those cities use “interim housing as a way to provide shelter for people experiencing homelessness, but they both need to develop additional permanent housing,” which is bunk. The housing first model is imploding before our very eyes.

Right or wrong, you’d think these guys would know how many people they were putting into this interim housing. Nope.

The auditor noted, “For example, Housing Commission did specify in an agreement for $1.6 million interim housing and supportive services that the provider would serve any number of people or set occupancy targets.”

There were no goals or benchmarks. There was money.

Californians are notorious for buying a lot of stuff and then wasting it.

California lost $30 billion in COVID budget to criminals, Nigerian princes, and state prisons. Julie Su was so bad, that she’s never been confirmed. She was able to cover up her bad behavior by introducing new federal rules.

Here is a thought.

Gavin Newsom is waiting for Joe Biden to withdraw from the presidential race so that he may use his glossy 8X10 photos to convince America of this blundering theft.